Small Biz Boomer

Life Lessons for All Generations

The Perils of Being Too Busy

#Time is your most valuable asset.

Cats & All That ™

Time is the one resource that equalizes everyone. No matter how much money or power you have, you get the same 24 hours a day that everyone else gets. Now you might be able to allocate resources to accomplish tasks for you, but those resources are trading in their time.

I recently created a dream board full of ideas and items I want to accomplish in my life time. Some are short-term, e.g. finish a book this week, and some are long-term (buy an apartment in Paris!). But one of the lessons that I have learned recently is to make time for your dreams. We all waste time. I saw a post that captured this perfectly.


In this case, it’s the trade-off between working out and playing Candy Crush (or in my case – Simpsons Tapped Out). I realized that I don’t want my life to be measured in increments…

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How to Deal with People Who Waste Your Time and Energy

We are all familiar with the genre – Dracula,  Twilight  – all contain fictional characters who thrive on the blood of the living to sustain their lives indefinitely.  This is often done at great cost to their victims  and often death of their victims.

Unfortunately in our business dealings,  we  all too often encounter people who resemble these fictional characters.  They schedule meetings and renege constantly.   They call you for a little advice or  the name of a  business contact.  Often  they are in over their heads with clients who pay hefty sums for your(their)  counsel.   They try to get items or services  for free.  They waste your time with conversations that seem to go on for an eternity.    It’s time to stop these time sucking, energy wasting people in their tracks.  We must learn to say no to people that don’t support our business interests and want to drain our time and energy.   Just say no.

Inspiring Boomer : Flo McAfee, Renaissance Woman

Small Biz Boomer

This was the first  blog posted  on this site in  2013.  Flo McAfee recently  published a Kindle version of her book “Grown-Up ABC’s Momma Taught Me” available on  Amazon.   The hard copy version will come out later this summer.   You can find her beautiful art works at

Flo McAfee is an army brat who has lead a very peripatetic life.  Always on the move, she grew up calling more than 20 places home during her formative years including Fort Bragg, North Carolina; Augsburg, Germany and West Point Military Academy.

Floydetta "Flo" McAfee Floydetta “Flo” McAfee

Flo also is a wife, step-mother, entrepreneur, political activist, public relations pro, writer, photographer, and artist.  She worked on numerous political campaigns including that of the late Senator Ted Kennedy.  She worked with the legendary advertising executive Caroline Jones  (see Flo’s Blog  She served at the White House during the Clinton…

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Black Women’s Roundtable Report: Black Women in the U.S.



Black Women in the United States, 2015, continues the Black Women’s Roundtable’s (BWR) annual inquiry into the challenges and triumphs of Black women across the U.S.  This year’s report, however, provides an even more nuanced examination of Black women’s experiences, not only uncovering broad, national trends, but also taking a specific deep dive into the conditions of Black women in key To that aim, we’ve included a special “Voices” section which shares the experiences and personal narratives of state-based BWR leaders who are on  the  front  lines, addressing every day issues that are central to the Black woman’s experience across the nation. As such, this report is unique. It provides a broad perspective on the conditions of Black women throughout the nation while also giving a  more refined view that allows an authentic reflection of the varied conditions  of  Black women. From the most remote rural areas of this nation to bustling urban centers, this report shares a three dimensional representation of the lives of Black women throughout these United States.

For more information go to


Get More Done by Focusing Less on Work

Is this the key to #Productivity?

Why Task Juggling Can Be Counterproductive

Multitasking? Think Again

Inspiring Boomer: Jan DuPlain- Connecting the World

In Washington, D.C. a city where relationships drive world affairs, Jan DuPlain is not just another networker. She is an international connector.

DuPlain in Jerusalem

Jan in Jerusalem

When the Gallup Leadership Institute, presented DuPlain with its Excellence Award in 1998, the organization commended her for her “ability to connect just the right person with just the right talent to make just the right contribution.” They extolled the impact of her work, noting, “With her help, alliances are forged and progress is made.”

Indeed her recent appointment as Embassy Liaison for the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center is a testament to that statement. DuPlain’s extensive international experience has included working with the Cultural Tourism DC, where she launched “Passport DC,” a month long, city-wide cultural celebration of Washington’s international and diplomatic community with 70 embassies hosting open houses.

 DuPlain with Tim and Craig Cox.  Tim is the Chair of Cultural Tourism DC, sponsor of  PASSPORT DC.

With Tim Cox(l) and Craig Cobine(r).
Cox is the Chair of Cultural Tourism DC, sponsor of PASSPORT DC.

As president of DuPlain Enterprises, a top local marketing and public relations firm she founded more than 18 years ago, she has also had numerous international clients.

DuPlain describes herself as a late bloomer who keeps blooming “Life is a series of changes,–so get ready, replace fear with faith-look at each beginning as an adventure”, she advises,
I started over many, many times. My confidence comes from knowing that “the challenge before you, is never as great as the power behind you!”

Born and raised in Southern California, she first came to Washington, D.C. to attend American University. After graduation in the 1960s she returned to California to sell ads for her father’s newspaper and later moved to New York City for a brief stint at CBS Cinema Center Films, working with celebrity columnists Leonard Lyons, Earl Wilson and television host Ed Sullivan.

Her passion for the arts caused her to move back to Washington D.C. in the early 1970s to do marketing work for the newly renovated Ford’s Theatre. “1971 was a pivotal year for the culture of Washington,” she said “the Kennedy Center and Wolf Trap Performing Arts Center opened up that year.. Nothing has ever been the same since—DC flourished and we are now rated as the 2nd highest ticket sales in theatre in the USA (after NYC).—we are truly a “world class cultural city!”

As a marketing rep for the Ford Theatre Society she worked closely with Frankie Hewitt, wife of legendary CBS “60 Minutes” Founder/Executive Producer Don Hewitt, who she described as her ultimate mentor and friend.

Loyalty has continued to define DuPlain, who has served as a mentor to numerous successful Washington business women. There is truth to the saying “make new friends but keep the old, one is silver and the other gold,” she said.

During the 1970s, she also got her consciousness raising from feminist Gloria Steinem (whose 80th birthday party she will attend this November in Philadelphia). DuPlain eventually took a job with General Electric where she managed a clearinghouse on alcohol information. While at GE she was especially concerned about the lack pf support for women and alcoholism. “there was no research on women, minimal treatment programs and prevention programs for women. She launched the first Women’s addiction group for the National Organization of Women (NOW) in DC and became the first Director on Women for the National Council on Alcoholism- she set up Task Forces around the USA to support women with alcohol and mental health issued.

She always had a air for acting so when she moved back to California she joined a repertory company that allowed her to star in many productions including a production of “Same Time Next Year.”

She returned to the east coast in 1983. DuPlain said “felt like starting over again” She took a job at Washington-area PBS station WETA-TV. From 1983-1995 she led its public relations department, raising the station’s visibility locally and nationally. The job included doing public relations for such legendary personalities as news host Bill Moyers, newsman Charlie Rose and actress Helen Mirren. She also spearheaded publicity efforts for the D.C. world premiere of documentary filmmaker Ken Burns’ multiple award-winning TV series, “The Civil War.”

After leaving WETA-TV in 1996 she founded DuPlain Enterprises ( The company’s title was homage to her late father, who first used it for his newspaper business. Over the years her company has managed major celebrities and clients including at the National Women’s History Museum where DuPlain worked with museum spokeswoman, actress Meryl Streep.

While she has been a frequent guest at the city’s top social gatherings and won numerous awards, DuPlain starts her and ends her day in a conventional way – for what she considers her most important connection. “The confidence I have didn’t come easy. This town keeps you humble.”

“Every day I get down on my knees,” she said.

With the Dalai Lama

With the Dalai Lama

For BabyBoomers Sometimes It’s Best to “Listen Down”

Recently I attended  a conference  where I met two young women  who had just attended a workshop for millennials.  One was  a millennial and  the other a Gen-Xer .  Both expressed concern about the lack of clarity and focus of  the  panel.  The workshop, they said, simply did not speak to them.  I asked them about their concerns and found they had some great ideas to what could have been done differently.  We then discussed their workplace situation.  It seems both faced barriers and constant challenges  from baby boomers who were still stuck on how things were done 20 years ago.   The boomers, they said, would not even try to . listen to their ideas.

No doubt about it we  baby boomers are amazing.  I do know and greatly appreciate “AARP” – the American Association for Retired Persons which advocates for us boomers and those older.   We have amazing  role models that remain relevant across generations .  Witness Aretha Franklin,    “The Queen of  Soul,” with a new comeback album that will “cover” the latest hits.   The late  Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Brendan Eich (the guy that invented JavaScript) remain tech industry  and social  icons.   Heck we even can claim a  U.S. President  (Barack Obama).   We are leaders of social change,  news anchors, business owners,  heads of state, corporate giants, authors and  we are  eternally young to boot.   Yet for far too many it has been hard for us  to make room for the generations that  have come after us.  While we have much wisdom and knowledge to pass on,  we have become rather stingy and egotistical about it.  We jealously guard our turf, not wanting to share.  Worst we don’t want to hear fresh ideas from those younger than us.  Yes, we will hire “young” presuming that younger  means cheaper just so long as  our ideals,  our wisdom, our  knowledge will still dominate.  That need, by the way, includes the workplace as well as the simple community event.     So where can we start to bridge the information/wisdom/knowledge gap?   Let’s just start by listening.   Young people have a lot to offer not just in terms of social media or new tech know-how.  Many are also quite wise.  Frankly, if  we #boomers are to really to  remain “forever young,” we have to start listening and respecting what we hear from members of   generations that follow us.    So  next time a seemingly overconfident millennial or gen-Xer offers you advice,  just listen.  It may be the first step in helping you change the world  or at least change your life.


5 Reasons Why Women Live Longer Than Men


Life expectancy in the U.S. is at an all-time high, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And while the news that we’re living, on average, to the ripe old age of 78 years and 9 ½ months isn’t that surprising, there is one stat that is: A girl born in 2012 can expect to live to 81.2 years—almost 5 years longer than a boy baby born the same year, who’s likely live to age 76.4. Weaker sex, indeed.

“Men are biologically and sociologically at a disadvantage from the time they’re conceived to the time they die,” says Marianne Legato, MD, professor emerita of clinical medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and founder and director of the Foundation for Gender-Specific Medicine. Here’s why:

Females are tougher in utero

Two and a half as many boys are conceived as girls, Dr…

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It’s Not the How or the What but the Who: Succeed by Surrounding Yourself with the Best

Thank you Angela Herin.

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